Saturday, April 08, 2017

AE Reads Skiffily Episode 5: "Beneath Impossible Circumstances" by Andrea Kneeland

Time for episode 5 of AE Reads Skiffily, the literature podcast that features science fiction stories read out loud with sound effects. This science fiction podcast features speculative fiction stories that inspire readers and listeners everywhere. Episode 5 is a little shorter than some of the other episodes, but still contains a full story for your listening pleasure.

Tuesday, March 07, 2017

AE Reads Skiffily Episode 4: "The Venus Effect" by Joseph Allen Hill

It's a few days late, but episode 4 of AE Reads Skiffily is ready for your listening pleasure. Episode 4 features a new first, female voices for female characters.If you are prepared for a scifi podcast that features people reading science fiction stories (as well as immersive sound effects), then begin listening now.

Monday, January 30, 2017

AE Reads Skiffily Episode 3: "The Lord of Discarded Things" by Lavie Tidhar

For your listening pleasure, episode 3 of AE Reads Skiffily is ready to tickle your ears and inspire your imagination. If you are new to the
podcast (and, let's be honest, you likely are), this scifi podcast involves readings from excerpts of science fiction stories by me, AE, along with helpful sound effects. This episode features a groundbreaking first for the podcast.

Saturday, December 24, 2016

AE Reads Skiffily Episode 2: "Taste the Singularity at the Food Truck Circus" by Jeremiah Tolbert

I have done it again. Episode 2 of AE Reads Skiffily is now available for your listening pleasure. Each episode of this science fiction podcast features me, AE, reading thought-provoking speculative fiction along with sound effects. Yes, that is right, you get the pew pew pew with your science fiction audio.

Friday, November 04, 2016

New Podcast Premiere - AE Reads Skiffily

Welcome everyone to the first episode of AE Reads Skiffily, a new podcast featuring me, AE. The core of this new science fiction podcast is my desire to share engaging speculative fiction and see new worlds jump out of the page onto other media. Each podcast episode will feature me reading excerpts from science fiction books, magazines, blogs, or wherever else science fiction is published. I assure you that the speculative fiction will be the kind that taps into your imagination and takes you to new and intriguing places.

Monday, October 24, 2016

Cobalt Eyes and Dark Skin - The Real Faces of Dune

As a fan of Frank Herbert’s Dune (1965), I have a love-hate relationship with the visual-media representation of the characters and styling of David Lynch’s (1984) and the Scifi Channel’s (2000, 2003) representation. On the one hand, it’s exciting to see a book come alive and to share thought-provoking content with my not-so-literate friends. On the other hand, when movies get your favorite characters wrong, your blood boils so bad that you need medical treatment from the Scary German Guy in Monster Squad (1987).

How do you say "I love your face sores" in German?
With the revelation of an unmade Dune project directed by Alejandro Jodorowsky (2013), a growing number of visual-media services capable of providing engaging multi-season adaptations of popular book series (I’m looking at you, Game of Thrones), original content from streaming services not bound by demands of conventional television (see Netflix et al.), and the willingness of the eldest of Herbert’s sons to soak money out of the Dune Franchise, it’s only a matter of time before another attempt at adapting the Dune series will engage (and disappoint) long-time Dune fans.

With that in mind, I would like to focus on a few characters who I feel didn’t get an accurate representation in the 1984 movie, the 2000 miniseries, or the 2003 Children of Dune miniseries. In addition to notable representations in video games and Jodorowsky’s failed project, I will also be sharing interesting art I’ve found via trolling through DeviantArt, giving credit along the way to artists I think have more accurately captured the characters in the book.

Wednesday, August 19, 2015

The Language of Riddley Walker (part 2)

In my last post, I talked about the portrayal of dialect in Riddley Walker and how author Russell Hoban clearly established the rules of the narrator's speech. Today, I am going to focus on what the grammatical rules of "Riddleyspeak" are. This is more than an academic exercise, as it relates to how people think about language and the ways people relate linguistic difference to culture and cognition.

Thursday, April 30, 2015

The Language of Riddley Walker

Today, I'm going to talk to you about Riddley Walker by Russell Hoban, a post-apocalyptic novel that takes place over 2,000 years in the future. More specifically, I'll be focusing on the language of this novel and using it to talk about the creative use of language, with some tips you can use in your own writing.

Tuesday, April 22, 2014

The Language of Cat's Cradle


I recently finished Kurt Vonnegut's Cat's Cradle, a novel about religion, science, and global annihilation.  A fun read for the whole family, which will not be spoiled in any way by my post today because I am going to talk about the fictional language haphazardly presented throughout the book.  You see, the narrator of Cat’s Cradle has converted to a religion (Bokononism) that originated from the fictional Caribbean island of San Larenzo and sprinkles the narrative with terms coined from its founder, Bokonon.  These seem at first like nonce words (foma, karass, granfalloon) but it is implied that they come from the creole language spoken on San Lorenzo.  Today, I’ll be sharing the process by which I figured out some of these words and how you can help.

Monday, March 13, 2006

Can Nibble is mmm

I was in Gilroy a few weeks ago and I came upon a sheet of paper on my car's winshield wiper. Expecting some sort of advertisement, I instead found an essay titled "Cannibalism Today":